Welcome

Bio and Autobiography

Artist Kim H. Ritter, M.ED., holds her City and Guilds Certificates in Patchwork and Quilting and in Design from the London Institute of the Arts. She has art quilts in private and corporate collections worldwide including the Quilts, Inc. Corporate Collection. Her work has appeared in Fiberarts Magazine, American Craft Magazine, Quilting Arts Magazine and FiberArts Design Book Six. Simply Quilts and NHK TV Japan have run TV segments on Ritter’s artwork. Kim is the author of Quick Quilting, a book for beginning quilters that has been published in four countries and translated into German and Russian.

Ritter was awarded a ten month Artist in Residency at the Center for Contemporary Craft in Houston Tx  in 2009. She has been named a Texas Original Artist by the Texas Commission on the Arts. She is the 2007 Featured Artist at Texas Children’s Cancer Center. Kim has exhibited widely including such venues as The Fresno Museum of Arts, Museum of the American Quilters Society, Houston Center for Contemporary Crafts, New Harmony Gallery, Thirteen Moons Gallery, Katie Gingrass Gallery, Chalk Farm Gallery and Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian.
   Selected international and national exhibitions which have toured Ritter’s work include “Quilt National 05”, “Women of Biblical Proportions” “Spirit & Strength: 2003 The Husqvarna Viking Gallery of Quilt Art,” “I Remember Mama,” “Fine Focus 02,04 and 06,” “Tarot Art Quilt Project,” “A Page from My Journal,” “911: Las Artistas Reaccionan,” “Masterpieces: A Voyage of Self Expression,” “America: From the Heart,” and “The Roots of Racism: Fear and Ignorance".
   Ritter served as Co-Director and Curator of Fine Focus 06, 04 and Fine Focus 02, small format art quilt exhibits which toured museums nationally for two years each. She was  Juror for Celebrate Spring at the International Quilt Festival in Chicago. She was also one of the Curators of Focus: Materials and Meaning, a small format art quilt invitational exhibit at Mixed Bag Gallery in Houston. She was the volunteer coordinator for America: From the Heart, an exhibit of quilts n response to September 11. She served two terms on the board of the International Quilt Association as Vice-President of Membership and has volunteered extensively for Studio Art Quilt Associates. She was one of the three original founding members ofthe board of Art Cars of Houston.

 

 

Kim's headshot with Blue hao9r

  All About Me

Born in 1956 and raised mid-century modern, I had a head start on creativity. I always had the big box of 64 Crayons, huge pads of paper and parents who valued creativity and a sense of humor. Daddy was an IBM exec who broke out of his dark suits and white shirts on the weekends to don Ricky Ricardo shirts, jump in his latest sports car and wield his latest camera in the search of some artistic outlet in his corporate life. Mother dabbled in numerology, painted, longed for clothes straight from Vogue and made them all herself. My favorite creation was a pink mini-dress with marabou feathers sewn to the bottom to make a tiny skirt. We lived in a modern house in Bartlesville, Oklahoma with flip down appliances and all aqua and red furnishings.

My maternal grandmother owed her own business, but made all of her own clothes and reupholstered her own modern sectional furniture many times over the years. That sofa is in my daughter’s house now and needing a new cover. My paternal grandmother spoiled me and taught me all the needle arts from knitting to rug hooking.

We were moved often over the years as I grew up and I was constantly being exposed to different types of people and absorbing new ideas. It was fertile ground for a young person searching for a voice. My brother is the poet Brent Hendricks.

I attended Emory University at 17, met my future husband at 18 and became a teacher after graduation. When I was 24 years old, we married and moved to New Orleans where I worked as a high school teacher in the pubic school system. We had a daughter five years later and a son in 1987. In 1992 we moved to London, where I completed my City and Guilds in Patchwork and Quilting and in Design.

In 1993, we moved to Copenhagen where I wrote my book Quick Quilting. I entered and won prizes at my first quilt competitions, the National Patchwork Championships in the UK and the American Quilt Society show in Paducah, Kentucky. In 1995, we returned to the US to Connecticut and in 1996 we landed in Houston, the home of the International Quilt Festival. Since my return to the states, I have concentrated all my energy in the studio and in getting my work out to the public. I also help promote the art of the quilt with my volunteer work for the International Quilt Association and Studio Art Quilt Associates and through my work as Co-Director of the national touring exhibition Fine Focus.

In 2009, Hurricane Ike destroyed my studio, leaving five feet of water in my house. The Houston Center for Contemporary Craft offered me an emergency Artist in Residence for October 2009 through September 2010, so that I could keep working, and I received a relief grant from the Texas Commission on the Arts in 2011. During that time, renovations dragged along on the house, so we bought a studio space in the Heights [area of Houston] for me to work in. Within a month or two, my husband, son, and I all moved into the tiny space. Renovations to the property, which had formerly been an artist studio, began in earnest.

In 2011, after my artist in residence, I had no place for a quilting machine or big printer, so I took a break from quilting to marry off my son in 2011 and my daughter in 2012.  We bought the house next to the studio and renovated it, moving in last August. In September 2013, I finally had a quilting and printing studio again and was off and quilting!

 

  

  More about Me

                 mulletkim.jpgkidkim.jpgkimkid.jpgkimpiano.jpg

    Born in 1956 and raised mid-century modern, I had a head start on creativity. I always had the big box of 64 Crayons, huge pads of paper and parents who valued creativity and a sense of humor.

          kim-guitar.jpgskyliner1.jpg                                                                                    skyliner2.jpg

      My parents were childhood sweethearts in a small town called Sapulpa, Oklahoma.

              My Parents were childhood sweetheartskbeauty.jpgkbeauty2.jpgdadyfootballweb.jpg                            weddingkayron.jpg

    Daddy was an IBM exec who broke out of his dark suits and white shirts on the weekends to don Ricky Ricardo shirts, jump in his latest sports car, play a few rounds of golf and wield his latest camera in the search of some artistic outlet in his corporate life.

Daddy modk1.jpgronkcar.jpgkaymod.jpg

     Mother dabbled in numerology, painted, longed for clothes straight from Vogue and made them all herself. My favorite creation was a pink mini-dress with     marabou feathers sewn to the bottom to make a tiny skirt. She was kooky and had us watch for UFO’s every nice evening in the summer in Oklahoma. We’d sit on the patio and watch while waiting for Daddy to come home from IBM.

kbkids2.jpg

    We lived in a modern house in Bartlesville, Oklahoma with flip down appliances and all aqua and red furnishings.

kaymod3.jpg2modkay.jpgkay2.jpg

    I am originally from Oklahoma and most of my family has some Native American roots. I had a great grandfather who was a sheriff in Indian Territory and another who was a Pony Express rider.

mimipapa-kay.jpg

 

    My maternal grandfather owned a pool hall (which my grandmother MiMi insisted was a “billiards parlor”) and later became country tax assessor. MiMi was the first woman in the chamber of commerce in her town; she owned a baby shop from the time my mother was little, that grew to children’s clothing as my mother grew up. She still had the Nancy Kay Shoppe when I was a kid so I was spoiled for clothes. She and her sister (who was a professional seamstress) made quilts. I have one they made.

    On the other side of the family I had a grandma who was a baby in the back of one of the wagons racing for land in the Oklahoma Land Run. My dad was the first one on the family to go to college. His dad went thru 3rd grade and went to work in the oil fields; his mom went all the way to 8th grade.  This grandmother, Nanny, spoiled me and taught me knitting, rug hooking, sewing, crochet and hand embroidery

nannyandkim.jpgnanny.jpggranddad.jpg

horseykim.jpg kbkids2.jpgkbkids.jpg

    We were moved often over the years as I grew up and I was constantly being exposed to different types of people and absorbing new ideas. It was fertile ground for a young person searching for a voice. My brother is the poet Brent Hendricks.